Renting a flat in Spain: Do’s and Don’ts

Being a foreigner living in Spain, finding a place to live is understandably quite an ordeal, especially when all the agreements are in a language that isn’t your first. It’s very easy to be discriminated against, or taken advantage of, and unfortunately, there are more than your fair share of dodgy landlords/landladies in Spain. Just like a tourist trap, a foreign worker or student is an easy target, but even Spanish people moving into the area can fall victim to the same things. No tip I am providing is totally full proof, but I have had some of the best and worst landlords/ landladies since moving here, and I want to share the experience so you have an idea about what you’re looking for.

Location Location Location?

First of all, you need to consider the area and price. Almost everyone when they move into a new city, wants to live somewhere in and around the centre. If you’re in a bigger city, that option could be too expensive for you. Smaller cities in most areas are a lot more affordable. But just how much more are you prepared to spend if there are notably cheaper options just 10 minutes walk away? in Major cities like Madrid and Barcelona, you’re likely to pay minimum 500€ a month to get near the centre. whereas other cities like Zaragoza and Toledo are more like 300€. True, these prices are a steal compared to England, but you are probably earning less, so you do the math.

Do some research about the neighbourhoods so that you know that you are in a comfortable and safe environment. The difference between these areas can be really drastic in the space of a couple of blocks. I live in Córdoba, and in a respectable neighbourhood which is easily affordable, but just 10- 15 minutes walk away are some real dives. I’m pretty sure you won’t have moved all the way here to be the Spanish equivalent of Hackney or Southwark, have you?

If you find a place that is in the city centre and is notably cheaper than other properties, there’re probably is a catch. Your room is probably a box, has no balcony, no air conditioning, is in a bad state, and so on. The number of potential flaws are endless. I would check it out first, and I would be careful if you see a place that’s notably marked up and the owner says it’s a really good deal for this neighbourhood. It usually isn’t, so see what you get for yourself.

Estate Agent, or App?

I’ve done both during my time here, and there are reasons to choose and not to choose each option. The estate agents are usually very professional and very helpful with your search. It’s also very unlikely that there is any illegal business taking place, and that it’s all by the books. The downsides are that the flats are almost certainly rented as a complete package, and not per room. There’s also an agency fee you would have to pay if a sale is agreed, usually equivalent of one month’s rent. Lastly, you are not guaranteed to have the flat furnished, so make sure you know what you are getting. If you are a group and are looking for a whole place to share , this isn’t a bad option.

Apps are usually cheaper, and you get so many more options at the tip of your finger, but the risks are tenfold. The most common apps I used were Badi, Idealista, and Fotocasa. I ditched Milanuncios when I was looking for my latest home, though there are some good places on that site, there were also a load of rubbish and unreliable ones. Badi is used almost entirely for flat sharing and It is really popular for students, and you’ll find most of the available rooms in neighbourhoods where students tend to prefer to live (Ciudad Jardín in Córdoba, Cappont in Lleida, and San Mamés in León are good examples.).

The other two are on par with each other, and I actually got my latest home via Fotocasa (which works better on a computer by the way). You need to be aware that many of flats will be advertised on more than one app and you might get a feeling of Deja Vu. You will also notice that a lot of the properties will have some sort of advertisement with another estate agent’s logo. I would avoid them unless you don’t mind paying for agency fees. The most frustrating thing about the apps is that you might express interest, but the room or flat is taken and they have forgotten to take the advert down. That happened to me so many times. The other downside is that many landlords may take advantage of you, and the legal disputes come in. The same places appear online year after year for a reason.

There are some surprising difficulties for you if you are looking to share a flat and you are a man and a worker like me. There were so many places that froze me out straight away for not being a student, and some that only wanted women to stay. It may be that male workers in Spain have more of a reputation of being more likely to be unreliable or difficult to work with, but it was rather frustrating trying to find somewhere. There are some places for that profile though, you are just more limited for choices, and couples looking to flat share have it even harder still. If you’re renting a flat outright for yourself, the gender gap closes dramatically and you are way more likely to find the ideal place, especially if you are a couple. Both estate agents and apps are usually very clear, and the Coronavirus crisis has forced many owners to not be so picky with who rent’s their property.

Read the contract carefully!

If you are completely new to a city, you might just accept the first place that looks semi- decent, but do you understand all their terms? or did you sign without even looking at it? You need to know every detail of the place before signing anything here in Spain, and Landlords show themselves in the worst light over things like this. I have experienced a lot of things, and it’s never too late to back out of an agreement if their tone is suspicious. The chances are your level of Spanish isn’t high enough to completely understand, so it’s very advisable to have someone who can help you out in that situation.

Two experiences spring to mind, the first in León when the landlady refused to give us our deposit back over non-existent damage, then proceeded to knock a wall through and take all our things to the free flat below, which had no hot water or a working kitchen. The second was in Lleida, when the landlady continually entered our place without warning and removed the internet after a few months into our stay claiming it was never part of the agreement and that it was our responsibility, then refused to return the deposit despite giving the required notice. Be careful.

Other things that some crooked landlords do, is charge different rates for rent depending on the person, or just before the agreement is made, so make sure you know that figure above everything else. You also need to be aware what is included in the rent. Is gas and electricity included? Internet? Water? Comunidad (council tax)? you need to know these things, then you’ll know if you’re being ripped off or not. Just remember, you might be a student or immigrant, but you have legal rights like everyone else, just make sure you have the evidence before taking it further if it’s worth it.

The Legal Technicalities

Just like in England, Spain has a number of rules in place to protect both parties involved. Many are the same, but there are some things you need to know:

In Spain, it is very rare for the tenant to be required to provide a guarantor in order to rent a property (even the estate agents), and I have never been asked to provide one.

In England, it’s normal to pay one month’s rent as a deposit, whereas in Spain, it can be two months. My current place costs 500€ a month in rent, but I had to pay a 1000€ deposit or fianza.

In Spain, the Landlord/landlady cannot enter your property under any circumstances unless permitted by a tenant. Even if they want to show someone a free room they can’t unless the tenants have been informed and asked permission. It’s not quite the same in England.

In Spain, the tenant may change the lock without reason, but it’s common courtesy to tell the owner and provide him/ her with a key, and the tenant must return all keys at the end of their contract or face prosecution. In England, the laws favour the landlord in this position, and unless there are special circumstances, tenants can’t do it.

In Spain, any modifications to the property, including having fibre optic internet installed, needs to be approved by the president of the building/ community as well as the landlord/ landlady. In England this responsibility is more often or not down to the owner and the legal entities of the council.

Things landlords/ landladies are really good at here in Spain.

While you might be thinking ‘This guy doesn’t like property owners at all does he?!’, There are some really amazing things the owners may do to make a tenant feel at home here in Spain. They can be very helpful and often leave a lot of things in the property for maintenance, including cleaning products for when you start out. Many will also help you out with some basic information to help you start your life here, such as giving you some local advice. My current Landlady has offered us her support for anything we need and it is reassuring. I know that some owners have even provided homecooked meals on the odd occasion for some of my friends here.

One thing for sure is that your landlord/ landlady usually lives locally and will usually resolve any issue with the property fairly swiftly or give you the number to resolve it yourself while they foot the bill. They usually respect your privacy on the same level as England, despite the odd exception of course. All that’s necessary is that anything that breaks and that isn’t your fault is well documented and that you are protected for that sort of thing. The last thing you want to be doing is fighting to get your deposit back.

Your guide about renting a flat as a summary:

Sharing a flat in good areas in most cities will set you back around 200-250€ rent for a good deal per month. in bigger cities or more expensive areas, expect to pay quite a bit more.

Ibiza, Bilbao, San Sebastian, Barcelona and Madrid are the most expensive places to rent in the country, just be aware of that.

Renting a flat for yourself will generally cost more, so maybe consider sharing before moving into a place of your own, get some perspective. In the aforementioned areas, you may find yourself paying way too much.

Read your contract carefully, and make sure you know what you are paying for and make sure the owner is legit.

Lastly, know your rights. It’s very easy to just abandon certain issues with owners because it’s not worth it. But sometimes you need to show them that you cannot be taken advantage of.

If you follow those tips, you’re a lot more likely to stay out of trouble and build the Spanish dream the way you want to. Happy hunting!

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